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AmyCanBe – Everywhere and Truth be Told

Amycanbe live

Italian indie band Amycanbe keeps getting better and better.  Everywhere and Truth be Told are two of the band’s more recent tracks – both are excellent.

Unlike many Italian bands, Amycanbe sings mainly in English realizing that by doing so, it extends its appeal virtually a million fold.

While music sung in Italian is popular in Italy and in a few other nations, it is not able to reach the same kind of audience as artists such as Madonna, Radio Head, U2 and all the other big name English language bands.

I’ve been following Amycanbe’s progress since I found out about this Italian indie band in 2009.

Amycanbe live
Amycanbe live

AmyCanBe, on the other hand, may well strike the right chord with international English speaking audiences.  Everywhere is one track by this Italian indie band which will help them achieve this aim.

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Stop reading, start speaking

Stop translating in your head and start speaking Italian for real with the only audio course that prompt you to speak.

Have a listen and see if you agree:

Amycanbe – Everywhere

[youtube width=”550″ height=”450″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0b51_eLMjw[/youtube]

Amycanbe – Truth be Told

[youtube width=”550″ height=”450″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCndMtOBmis[/youtube]

If you liked what you heard, you can listen to more Amycanbe music on  Amycanbe’s myspace page, where you will also find gig dates in Italy and elsewhere or YouTube:  Amycanbe

And if you really, really, like Amycanbe’s sound, go add to the nearly 5,000 likes they’ve got on their Facebook page:  Amycanbe on Facebook.

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